Category Archives: Criminal law

That’s precisely what I mean!

Let’s get something straight to start with – I’ve reached that age where I’m turning into a grumpy old bat. I appreciate good manners, hate mobile ‘phones (why is it that the people who feel the need to use them … Continue reading

Posted in Contract law, Criminal law, exams, General, land law, studying law, teaching law | Comments Off

Death can be fatal…

Long time no blog! Things seem to have been very busy of late, but now we’ve got the New Year exam season out of the way, perhaps it’s time for a little reflection. In discussing the issues with a fellow … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal law, exams, General, studying law, teaching law | Comments Off

Rugby, the law and strict liability

One of the things many students find difficult when first studying law is the need to apply the principles to the facts of a situation, regardless of personal feeling. The need for certainty and consistency is emphasised, and it is … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal law, rugby | Comments Off

Alliteration leads the way for learning in law?

From William Langland’s Piers Plowman to the sports pages of The Independent, and the glory of headlines like “Elwood excels as England are Engulged” (why can’t they show this one on ESPN Classic?) I’ve always enjoyed a good bit of alliteration. However, until now, I hadn’t really considered its possibility as a viable learning aid in the study of law. It appears I was wrong….. Continue reading

Posted in Criminal law, General, land law, rugby, studying law, teaching law, Tort | Comments Off

Still harping on Hinks

Right now I should be doing my lecture notes on burglary (a wonderful subject, not least for the joys of Lord Edmund Davies’ description of the facts in R v Collins, available on www.bailii.org [1972] EWCA Crim 1) but, as usual, I’m struggling to get my mind past theft and, in particular, the case of Hinks… Continue reading

Posted in Criminal law, General, studying law, teaching law | Comments Off

Preparing notes on Pedigree Chum…..

OK, I admit it, I’ve been ducking this moment for some time. Over the years I have become pathetically attached to the law of provocation. I’ve found the ins and outs of personal characteristics in relation to the second limb of the objective test fascinating, and I thoroughly enjoy teaching the subject. Not any more. Thanks to the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, provocation is no more. We have a new partial defence of “loss of control” and I need to update my lecture materials to take this into account, like it or not. Continue reading

Posted in Criminal law, exams, studying law, teaching law | 3 Comments